On this episode of Your Right to Speak we talk with Freddy Brobbey who has his own music company JustOverMusic. Freddy is the Creative Director/Producer at JustOverMusic and works within the York South Weston community in Toronto. We talk about his work and how power can have positive impacts on young people. The majority of Freddy’s works is decreasing the stigma of entering the music world. The underlying theme of Freddy’s work is mentorship and guiding young people on a positive path. The conversation turns on the stigmas that the youth who Freddy works with face and the impacts of systemic oppression.  As well as some of the barriers to the grant system and the not for profit sector. 
 
JustOverMusic website: https://justovermusic.com/crew/
 
Let's raise awareness together!
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In this episode, Wolfgang speaks with Dr. Kiran Modi about alternative care in India. A country with more children than the total population (children, youth, adults) of “the English-speaking countries” combined (Aotearoa/New Zealand, Australia, Britain, Canada, and USA). About 31 million of these children are orphans, homeless, street-involved or otherwise lack parental care. In our conversation, Dr. Modi addresses reasons for the high numbers of children in need, effective and ineffective responses, successful programs, cultural specificity, funding, and research into alternative care in a South Asian context.

Dr. Modi, is the founder & managing trustee of Udayan Care, a New Delhi-based child rights organization, which provides homes, schooling, mentorship, employment, offered through 15 small group care homes in 8 states of India. To learn more about Udayan Care visit http://www.udayancare.org/ and to read the peer reviewed Institutionalised Children Explorations and Beyond: An International Journal on Alternative Care visit http://www.indianjournals.com/ijor.aspx?target=ijor:iceb&type=home

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On this episode of Your Right to Speak, Sammy speaks with Smyrna, a team member of Yantics which is an onling outlet for youth networking. Smyrna gives some examples on how adults can sometimes discrimination against young people and explains the sometimes it is not attentional. The conversation then turns to the importance of adult youth partnership, the benefits of mentorship and how both young people and adults can learn from each other.

 

For more information on Yantics please see below

Yantics.com is a by youth, for youth website developed for youth to network, connect, promote themselves, find help and assistance, be entertained, shop and share their ideas all in one spot.

Website: www.Yantics.com

Instagram: www.instagram.com/yanticsdotcom

Twitter: www.twitter.com/yanticsdotcom

Tumblr: yantics.tumblr.com

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiJ_rn9HdBOokSas_oMgFOg   

Facebook page: Yantics Youth

Let’s raise awareness together!

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In this interview, Maria Lotty discusses six principles of trauma-informed care, and how to integrate these principles when working with children and youth, particularly in the context of foster parenting. Maria is a practicing Fostering Social Worker and PhD student at the University College Cork (UCC), in Ireland. Maria has a background in youth work, residential social work and child protection. She is currently undertaking a research collaboration between UCC and Tulsa- Family and Child Agency involving the design, development and evaluation of Fostering Connections, a Trauma-informed Foster Care Program.

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On this episode of Your Right To Speak, Salvatore talks with Mafo about violence against women. Mafo explains the gasp in services offered with a focus on the shelter system. The conversation turns to how there are systemic issues and that there needs to be better funding provided by the government to make services more efficient. 

Let's raise awareness together!

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In this conversation, Liam Curran talks about FASDs, what they are, there prevalence in the child welfare system, issues with diagnoses, and responding from a social perspective.

Liam is a social worker, Certified CDC Educator of FASDs, and a member of the Centre for Research on Children and Families (CRCF) at McGill university, Montreal. He is currently undertaking his PhD at Concordia University, Montreal, focusing on how social workers respond to FASDs in child welfare settings. Liam has researched and published numerous articles, chapters and co-authored a book on the topic of FASDs.

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On this episode of Your Right to Speak, Salvatore talks with Elena Gordon who is the Youth Justice Case Lead at For Youth Initiative. Elena talks about the gaps within the youth justice sector and the need for change in the sector. Elena stresses in the conversation there needs to be more education offered to young people regarding youth justice. The discussion then turns to the pros and cons of utilizing restorative justice.  For more information For Youth Initiative, please visit http://www.foryouth.ca/

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On this episode, Wolfgang and Salvatore have a conversation about Salvatore’s recently completed Master’s research paper. In the discussion, Salvatore explains the term “adultism”, how it shows up in special education policy, the relevance of policy for those who work with children and youth, and how to work with young people (particularly those labeled disabled) to address adultism.

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On this episode of Your Right to Speak Salvatore talks with Nancy Marshall and Falon Wilton. The conversation continues from last month’s episode on the topic of disability. This month we have a focus on autistic young people. Nancy and Falon explain using the term autistic versus autism and the impacts that can come from using the term autism. Nancy and Falon stress that a social justice lens should be used when working in the disability community, with verbal and non-verbal children and youth.  

Let’s raise awareness together!

If you are a child or youth that would like to be on the show or have a topic that you think we should discuss, please email Salvatore at yourrighttospeak@gmail.com

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In this conversation with Dr. Julie Repper, we talk about people with “lived experience” working in the mental health system, Recovery Colleges, peer support workers, and what impact sharing one’s own experiences can have.

Dr. Repper is the director of Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change (ImROC), an organization based in Nottinghamshire, UK. She is a nurse, a manager, a researcher and lecturer focusing in particular on mental health services, and Recovery approaches.

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